Binary Options App scams

Binary Options scams are a dime a dozen and more are coming out of the woodwork each month. We’ve posted about Binary Options scams before.

I’m going to share two new ones we’ve discovered recently, which are sending out spam with “Private Invitations” to hundreds of people. Obviously, they are not quite so limited or exclusive as you would be led to believe.

PushMoneyApp.com

The first Binary Options scam is called the “PushMoneyApp” (PMA) from PushMoneyApp.com

There are plenty of websites detailing just how scammy this app is, along with reviews by people caught up in the scam decrying the loss of their initial deposit and continued upsell requests.
The idea behind the PushMoneyApp is you deposit $250 and in a short time you’ve earned thousands without any further effort. Following the old saying “if it’s too good to be true, it probably is”, you will instead quickly find your funds gone and the PMA people asking for more.

Money for nothing
Money for nothing

The website has interesting videos with actors pretending they’ve earned a lot of money from this application. The site disclaimer even advises “IN SOME CASES ACTORS HAVE BEEN USED…” so at least they admit as much.

They also advise “NO REPRESENTATION IS BEING MADE THAT ANY ACCOUNT WILL OR IS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE PROFIT OR LOSSES SIMILAR TO THOSE SHOWN” and “HYPOTHETICAL OR SIMULATED PERFORMANCE RESULTS HAVE CERTAIN LIMITATIONS. UNLIKE AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE RECORD, SIMULATED RESULTS DO NOT REPRESENT ACTUAL TRADING” so at least they’ve attempted to cover themselves.

If you visit the website, either directly or via your special “exclusive” link, you can watch the actors discussing the benefits of the application and you will see a form to fill in your name and email address in order to sign up.

If you instead try to leave the page, you will experience a pop-up begging you to stay. You will then be redirected to an even-more exclusive signup page which pretends they have only one license left.

They also have a random number of people “currently signing up to this form”. However, if you refresh the page this number jumps around. It also animates an increasing number of people so you can be sure this ‘exclusive’ offer is being taken up by more and more people.

The domain “PushMoneyApp.com” itself was only registered by Tim Atkinson in January 2016 which is suspicious in itself. I’ll leave it up to you to perform a Google Search on that name.

You can always find fake reviews of the site such as the one I found on “PushMoneyApps.com” (notice the ‘s’ at the end):

PushMoneyApps.com
PushMoneyApps.com

This site was registered in February 2016 for the sole purpose of assuring you that the PushMoneyApp.com site is really real.
There are other sites around which pretend to review this app and site as well. Most reviews on the sites with positive reviews were written around February 12th 2016 and have fake images stolen from other websites:

Not Sonia Lewis
Not Sonia Lewis

The text below the photo says “Hi! I am Sonia Lewis, creator of this site.” A reverse image search shows it’s in fact “Stephanie Kaplan Lewis Co-founder, CEO & Editor-in-Chief, Her Campus Media,” whom probably would be annoyed to know her photo is being associated with a scam review site. Interestingly enough, if I try to exit this review site it redirects me to an exclusive invite-only page on PushMoneyApp.com (!)

DrexelCode.com

Another app and site we’ve come across recently is called DrexelCode.com:

Drexel Code
Drexel Code

It espouses similar results from the Binary Options scam realm. but is not any more likely to increase your bank account. In fact, quite the opposite.

It was also registered earlier this year on the 4th of March, 2016.

If you try to navigate away, you get the usual scammy popup begging you to stay.

And another image tempting you to sign up for bigger returns supposedly from Cory Drexel, but appears to have been copied from a Social website:

Show me the money
Show me the money

Aussie Method

The “Aussie Method” aka “Canuck Method” and  “Brit Method”, among others is yet another Binary Options scam making the rounds. There are plenty of websites detailing how scammy these offers are, so keep your eyes open and your wallets closed.

Aussie Method man
Not Jake Pertu, Jason Flanagan or Jason Taylor

You can see from the graphs below exactly how much spam is generated from these fake free-money apps and websites. PushMoneyApp appears to be cyclical in its spamming and the DrexelCode spam is rising:

Binary Options Campaigns Overtime
Binary Options Campaigns Overtime

Keep yourself and your money safe and talk to an investment specialist rather than giving money to random, unknown people on the internet.

Article by: Jason “Don’t believe everything you read” Oakley


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